Peter Dutton concedes that Australia’s chaotic vaccine rollout has faced some ‘teething problems’ as six million Aussies prepare to get the jab from next weekHome Affairs Minister Peter Dutton admits ‘teething problems’ to vaccine rolloutOnline booking system has been plagued with problems as people rush for jabDoctors have also been caught unaware and overwhelmed with appointmentsMore than six million Australians become eligible for the vaccine next week 

Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton denies the federal government has botched the Covid-19 vaccine rollout but concedes there have been some issues. 

Mr Dutton admitted there were ‘teething issues’ as phase 1b of the rollout is set to begin next Monday against the backdrop of several setbacks.

The online booking system has been plagued with problems, local doctors have been overwhelmed with requests and there are fears the government will miss its October deadline to vaccinate all Australians.

‘These teething problems will happen but there are almost a quarter of a million people who have been vaccinated already and the numbers will ramp up dramatically,’ Mr Dutton said.

Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton denies the federal government has botched the Covid-19 vaccine rollout but concedes there have been some issues

Mr Dutton admitted there were ‘teething issues’ as phase 1b of the rollout is set to begin next Monday against the backdrop of several setbacks.

More than six million Australians become eligible to receive their coronavirus vaccine next week.

The next phase includes people aged over 70, Indigenous Australians over 55, younger adults with a medical condition or disability and workers deemed at critical or high risk.

But there have already been serious problems with the rollout.

Many GPs were caught off guard by the government’s announcement they were taking bookings while some are still waiting to be told how many doses of vaccine they will receive. 

Australia is lagging behind many other countries and some medical clinics remain confused about the timelines. 

Australian Medical Association president Omar Khorshid said the government needed to set clearer expectations.

‘Perhaps they should have been a little bit more clear with the public that actually this is a really slow start to the rollout,’ he said.

‘That 6.5 million people can’t have their vaccine in the first week when they’ve only got 200,000 doses.’ 

Deputy Opposition Leader Richard Marles said the economic recovery was directly tied to the vaccine rollout.

Australia is lagging behind many other countries and some medical clinics remain confused about the timelines

‘We all want to see this happen smoothly,’ he said.

‘But the government has been making a whole lot of heroic promises that they really have not been able to keep. They said four million of us were going to be vaccinated this month. That is clearly not going to happen.

‘We need to see this roll out safely and carefully but it needs to be done with some speed.’  

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