Labour leader Keir Starmer, 58, gets his first vaccine dose as it’s revealed Boris Johnson, 56, is expected to get it THIS WEEKPM is 56, meaning he can book an appointment rather than wait for invitation Government sources say Mr Johnson will have his jab this week Downing Street spent past week being coy about timeline for his first jab 

Boris Johnson is expected to have his own first dose of coronavirus vaccine this week. 

The Prime Minister is 56, meaning he is at the age when those still awaiting a jab can book an appointment themselves rather than waiting for an invitation.

Government sources say Mr Johnson will have his jab this week, while an increase in vaccine supplies will boost the number of second doses – although reports that all adults could be vaccinated by June were played down. 

Downing Street had spent the last week being coy about when the PM would get his first inoculation, with his official spokesman refusing to confirm a date, saying he would receive it when it was his turn.

 It came as labour Leader Sir Keir Starmer revealed he had had his first dose. After his treatment at the Francis Crick institute in Kings Cross, North London, he said: ‘It has been such a difficult year and the vaccination programme is the light at the end of the tunnel. 

‘The vaccine is safe, effective and I urge everyone in our community to take it when it’s their turn.’

So far, more than 23.68million vaccine doses have been administered in the UK with 1.45million people fully vaccinated. 

And it has helped set the Covid case and death rates plummeting.

The Prime Minister is 56, meaning he is at the age when those still awaiting a jab can book an appointment themselves rather than waiting for an invitation

No10’s scientific advisory panel SAGE estimates the reproduction rate — the average number of people infected by each person with coronavirus — is between 0.6 and 0.8 across the UK and England, meaning the outbreak is still shrinking.

This was also the level given for England, and the regions the East of England, London, Midlands, North West and South East.

It was slightly higher in the North East and Yorkshire, where it is likely between 0.7 and 0.9, and slightly lower in the South West where it was between 0.5 and 0.8.

No regions had an R rate over 1, suggesting the second wave is still shrinking in all areas.

Office for National Statistics experts claimed yesterday that the total number of people infected with Covid in England fell by a fifth to just over 200,000 last week — the equivalent of one in 270 people.

And data from a major symptom-tracking app today claimed 4,200 people are becoming ill with the disease every day — down by a third in a week.

Professor Tim Spector, a King’s College London epidemiologist behind the study, said he believes the ‘darkest days are behind us.’

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