Britain today announced 359 more coronavirus deaths, taking the official number of victims one step closer to the 40,000 mark – despite other figures showing the real number of fatalities has already tipped 50,000.

Department of Health bosses revealed 328 people died after testing positive for Covid-19 in England in all settings including care homes, followed by 17 in Wales, 12 in Scotland and two in Northern Ireland.

It means the official number of victims is now 39,728 but other data that includes Brits who are suspected to have died from coronavirus shows the true toll is almost 10,000 higher.

The daily figure is down almost 13 per cent on the 412 deaths recorded last Wednesday, which was slightly higher than usual because of a recording delay over the Bank Holiday weekend. 

Health chiefs yesterday announced 324 deaths – a 68 per cent drop in the space of a fortnight. And a top Oxford University expert predicted Britain is on track to have zero Covid-19 deaths by July.

It comes as a shocking analysis of figures today revealed the coronavirus pandemic has driven up rates of excess deaths in some parts of London to double what they are in a usual year – with the borough of Brent being the worst hit area of England and Wales.   

Other official figures released today showed more than 170,000 tests were carried out yesterday, and 1,871 people tested positive for the disease, as the outbreak continues to fizzle out. 

In other coronavirus news today:

McDonald’s will open another 497 drive-thru restaurants today and is aiming to have more than 1,000 back in business by next week. Monstrous queues have been pictured outside those that have reopened;The Government is doubling down on its 14-day quarantine rule for travellers entering Britain. Home Secretary Priti Patel said it was necessary to prevent more coronavirus outbreaks and deaths;West London – Ealing, Hillingdon and Hounslow – is the area of the capital where people have received the most police fines for breaking lockdown rules. 165 fines were issued there between March 27 and May 14;Labour leader Keir Starmer has warned Boris Johnson to ‘get a grip’ on the coronavirus crisis and accused him of ‘winging it’;UK charity the Health Foundation has warned of a ‘digital divide’ that could be caused by the NHS’s contact tracing app because elderly people, the unemployed and manual workers are less likely to download it. 

The number of excess deaths in England and Wales spiked dramatically during the peak of the coronavirus outbreak. Professor Carl Heneghan, an Oxford University epidemiologist, predicted that the number of people dying would fall to average levels again by July

Separate data published yesterday showed that Birmingham has recorded the most deaths of diagnosed coronavirus patients, with 1,082 victims

HOW CAN THERE HAVE BEEN 50,000 VICTIMS IF THE OFFICIAL DEATH COUNT IS FEWER THAN 40,000? 

Department of Health officials only include patients who have tested positive for the SARS-CoV-2 virus, meaning its death count is always slightly lower – 39,584 fatalities have been recorded by health chiefs.

But data compiled by the statistical bodies of each of the home nations show the number of deaths involving Covid-19 in the UK has now passed 50,000, according to the latest available data. 

Figures published this morning by the National Records of Scotland – the country’s official statistical body – showed that 3,911 deaths involving Covid-19 had been registered in Scotland up to May 31. 

Data published from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) yesterday showed that 44,401 deaths involving Covid-19 had occurred in England and Wales up to May 22. 

And the latest figures from the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency, published last week, showed 716 deaths involving Covid-19 had occurred in Northern Ireland up to May 22. 

Together these figures mean so far 49,028 deaths have been registered in the UK where Covid-19 was mentioned on the death certificate, including suspected cases. 

Further deaths can be added to this total, concerning those deaths that have been reported as taking place since the period covered by the latest registration data. 

Between May 23 and June 1, a further 931 hospital patients who had tested positive for Covid-19 died in England, according to the latest figures from NHS England.

And a further 78 people in hospital and care homes who had tested positive for Covid-19 died in Wales during this same period, according to Public Health Wales. 

In Northern Ireland, 22 people who had tested positive for Covid-19 died between May 23 and June 2, according to the Northern Ireland Department of Health. 

These add up to a further 1,031 deaths since May 23, and with the total figure of 49,028 registered deaths, means the overall death toll for the UK is now just over 50,000, at 50,059. 

Details of deaths that took place in Scotland since the cut-off point for the latest registration data – in other words, deaths on either June 1 or June 2 – are not available. 

Each nation’s health agency report their own figures. These numbers do not always match with the Department of Health count because of a difference in how they are recorded.

NHS England today recorded 179 more deaths in hospitals, while Wales posted 17 in all settings, followed by 11 in Scotland and eight in Northern Ireland.

NHS England revealed four of the 179 new victims who died had no underlying health conditions. The youngest of the fatalities included a 12 year old who wasn’t named.   

It comes as it was revealed the number of deaths involving Covid-19 in the UK has now passed 50,000, according to the latest available data. 

Figures published on Wednesday by the National Records of Scotland showed that 3,911 deaths involving Covid-19 had been registered in Scotland up to May 31. 

ONS data yesterday showed that 44,401 deaths involving Covid-19 had occurred in England and Wales up to May 22. 

And the latest figures from the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency, published last week, showed 716 deaths involving Covid-19 had occurred in Northern Ireland up to May 22. 

Together these figures mean so far 49,028 deaths have been registered in the UK where Covid-19 was mentioned on the death certificate, including suspected cases. 

Further deaths can be added to this total, concerning those deaths that have been reported as taking place since the period covered by the latest registration data. 

Between May 23 and June 1, a further 931 hospital patients who had tested positive for Covid-19 died in England, according to the latest figures from NHS England.

And a further 78 people in hospital and care homes who had tested positive for Covid-19 died in Wales during this same period, according to Public Health Wales. 

In Northern Ireland, 22 people who had tested positive for Covid-19 died between May 23 and June 2, according to the Northern Ireland Department of Health. 

These add up to a further 1,031 deaths since May 23, and with the total figure of 49,028 registered deaths, means the overall death toll for the UK is now just over 50,000, at 50,059. 

Details of deaths that took place in Scotland since the cut-off point for the latest registration data – in other words, deaths on either June 1 or June 2 – are not available. 

A separate batch of data analysed by The Telegraph shows that 17 out of the 20 worst affected places across the two countries are all boroughs of the capital.

As well as Brent, other parts of London that witnessed their death tolls approximately double were Harrow (99.7 per cent increase), Newham (95.4 per cent) and Enfield (90.3 per cent).

The highest increase in deaths outside of London was seen in Hertsmere in Hertfordshire, where fatalities rose by 86.2 per cent from 236 to 439.

And while not all of these people have been direct victims of the coronavirus, many have died because of indirect impacts of the outbreak, such as reduced NHS services. 

The data includes people who died of any cause between January 1 and May 22 in each of the local authorities in England and Wales. 

More than a dozen areas across the two countries actually appeared to be unaffected by the outbreak and saw the numbers of people dying fall to lower-than average levels.  

In North East Lincolnshire the death rate dropped by 8.8 per cent, while it fell by 8.2 per cent in Conwy, Wales, and by five per cent on Anglesey, off the Welsh coast.

Excess deaths are considered to be an accurate measure of the number of people killed by the pandemic because they include a broader spectrum of victims.

As well as including people who may have died with Covid-19 without ever being tested, the data also shows how many more people died because their medical treatment was postponed, for example, or who didn’t or couldn’t get to hospital when they were seriously ill.

WHICH AREAS RECORDED THE MOST EXCESS DEATHS DURING THE CORONAVIRUS OUTBREAK? (Data January-May. Source: The Telegraph)  PLACE NAME AVERAGE DEATHS 2020 DEATHS EXCESS DEATHS % CHANGE Brent 445 925 480 108% Harrow 388 775 387 100% Newham 338 661 323 96% Enfield 516 981 465 90% Hertsmere 236 439 203 86% Ealing 503 918 415 83% Haringey 311 564 253 81% Barnet 613 1,101 488 80% Hackney 283 508 225 80% Westminster 272 486 214 79% Croydon 625 1,106 481 77% Southwark 332 583 251 76% Merton 318 550 232 73% Hammersmith 236 409 173 73% Waltham Forest 355 614 259 73% Mole Valley 217 374 157 72% Lambeth 374 642 268 72% Redbridge 455 780 325 71% Greenwich 383 649 266 69% Surrey Heath 202 340 138 68%

Experts are divided, however, on how accurate excess deaths are as a measure.

Oxford University’s Professor Carl Heneghan yesterday said that comparing deaths this year to an average taken from the past five years overlooked population growth.

He said the average could have been expected to be higher because there are more people, and more elderly people, in the UK than there were in 2015. 

If true, this could mean the impact of the Covid-19 epidemic was overestimated.

WEEKLY CORONAVIRUS DEATHS ARE LOWEST SINCE LOCKDOWN

The weekly coronavirus death toll in England and Wales has dropped to its lowest levels since the lockdown began in March, promising statistics today revealed. 

Data from the Office for National Statistics showed 1,983 people died across the two counties in the week ending May 22, down from 2,766 a week earlier and the lowest figure for two months.

Every week since March 27 has recorded more fatalities from the virus, showing that Britain is now en route to how it was before the unprecedented lockdown was imposed on March 23.

At the peak of the outbreak, a staggering 16,000 people in England and Wales died of the coronavirus in just two weeks in April. 

But the sobering statistics also show that there have now almost certainly been more than 50,000 people killed by Covid-19 across the UK this year.  

The coronavirus was listed as a contributing factor on the death certificates of at least 47,871 people by May 22, cementing Britain’s position as one of the worst-hit countries in the world.

Meanwhile, the University of Cambridge’s Professor David Spiegelhalter, argued the measure is still useful.

He said: ‘Deaths this year were tracking pretty close to, but below, the five year average. There is no perfect baseline.

‘I still think [the five-year average] is useful to give an idea of trends, peaks and spikes, but it is not a precise measure.’

Professor Heneghan yesterday said he expects the number of deaths to have returned to normal by next week. 

He said: ‘If the trends continue, the deaths look like they will be back to where they should be normally by next week.

‘There’s been a continued reduction in hospital deaths, care home outbreaks are coming down so the “all deaths” by (week) 22 I’m expecting will be back to where we should be.’

Professor Heneghan said there may be no Covid-19 deaths by the end of June – which would follow Spain yesterday. Italy is still reporting between 50 and 100 deaths per day, and France around 30.

‘But it also depends on what happens next, within sporadic outbreaks,’ Professor Heneghan said.

Experts say that unless care home and hospital outbreaks cannot be stopped, deaths caused by the coronavirus will continue at low levels. 

Data published in The Telegraph showed that the top five worst affected areas were Brent, Harrow, Newham, Enfield and Hertsmere, which all had total death increases of more than 86 per cent.

These were followed by Ealing (83 per cent), Haringey (81 per cent), Barnet (80 per cent), Hackney (80 per cent) and Westminster (79 per cent).

Others in the 20 worst-affected areas, most of which were in London, were Croydon, Southwark, Merton, Hammersmith & Fulham, Waltham Forest, Mole Valley (Surrey), Lambeth, Redbridge, Greenwich and Surrey Heath. 

At the other end of the scale, some more rural areas of the country saw the number of people dying drop from its usual level.

This may have been because those areas were relatively untouched by the coronavirus but the lockdown had other health benefits – reducing the transmission of flu, for example, which kills older people, or fewer car crashes.

Or it may simply have been because fewer people were dying anyway and the rate wasn’t increased by the virus as it was in other areas of the country.

The list of areas where the coronavirus appears to have had the least impact on the number of people dying is topped by North East Lincolnshire, where fatalities dropped by 8.8 per cent, and Conwy in Wales, where they fell by 8.2 per cent.

The number of people dying also dropped in Anglesey (-5 per cent), Hastings (-4.9 per cent), Torridge (-4.6 per cent), Mendip (-2.4 per cent) and Rother (-1.5 per cent).

Other areas recording slightly lower than usual numbers of deaths in January to May were Gwynedd, Isle of Wight, Ceredigion, Mid Devon, North Devon and East Devon. 

IN WHICH AREAS HAVE DEATHS BEEN LOWER THAN AVERAGE DURING THE CORONAVIRUS EPIDEMIC? (Data January-May. Source: The Telegraph)  PLACE NAME AVERAGE DEATHS 2020 DEATHS EXCESS DEATHS % CHANGE North East Lincolnshire 445 406 -39 -8.8% Conwy 405 372 -33 -8.1% Isle of Anglesey 212 201 -11 -5.2% Hastings 260 247 -13 -5.0% Torridge 214 204 -10 -4.7% Mendip 297 290 -7 -2.4% Rother 357 352 -5 -1.4% Gwynedd 354 351 -3 -0.8% Isle of Wight 457 454 -3 -0.7% Ceredigion 204 203 -1 -0.5% Mid Devon 205 204 -1 -0.5% North Devon 300 299 -1 -0.3% East Devon 477 476 -1 -0.2%

London hasn’t recorded 100 Covid-19 cases in a day for nearly a MONTH, official figures show (so, how many people have been struck down in YOUR town?)

It has been almost a month since London diagnosed a hundred coronavirus patients in one day, statistics show in a sign the outbreak is fading in the capital. 

Department of Health figures reveal May 7 was the last time more than 100 people tested positive for Covid-19 in the city, when 147 people were diagnosed with the life-threatening disease. 

This has fallen consistently to just 19 on May 25, the lowest recorded on a weekday since the outbreak spiralled out of control, showing the capital has emerged from the epidemic’s darkest days.

Only the South West, which has been least affected by the epidemic, has gone longer without 100 cases in a day, since 113 tested positive on May 1. 

More than 1,000 people were being diagnosed every day in London at the peak of the outbreak but the number of cases has now plummeted to just dozens.

Data shows the average number of people getting diagnosed every day in the capital fell by 82 per cent in the last week of May compared to the first, from 136 to 25. Average daily positive tests in all regions more than halved over the same period, although statistics are still being updated.

Falling diagnoses comes despite an increase in the number of tests being carried out – 630,000 tests were done in the week ending May 7, compared to 836,000 up to May 25. Other regions have also seen drops in the number of people being diagnosed with the virus.

In the North West, positive tests dropped from a month high of 342 on May 5 to 105 on May 25. And in the East of England they fell from 266 on May 1 to 79 on May 25.

Case results have been even lower this week but it can take days for results to be analysed and fewer are recorded at the weekends, meaning last week is the most accurate recent measure.

The data comes as separate statistics today revealed that the virus had pushed the numbers of deaths from all causes to more than double in some parts of London. 

May 7 was the last time more than 100 people tested positive for Covid-19 in the city, when 147 people were diagnosed. This has fallen consistently to just 19 on May 25, the lowest for a weekday since the outbreak spiralled out of control, showing the capital has emerged from the epidemic’s darkest days

The South West has gone the longest without recording 100 new cases in a day out of all England’s regions, Public Health England data shows – since May 1.

The North East has not hit the figure since May 9. For the East Midlands it was May 13, for Yorkshire and the West Midlands May 19, for East of England May 21, for South East England May 22, and for the North West – the most recent – it was May 29. 

Since the start of the coronavirus outbreak, London has been the region with the most cases of the virus diagnosed, with a total of 27,021.

However the North East of England, which had a lower total (10,266) has had a higher rate of infection. 

There, 386 people per 100,000 have caught the virus, compared to 303 per 100,000 in the capital.

The rate was also higher than London’s in the North West, where it has been 354 cases per 100,000 people but a total of 25,796 – almost as high as London’s.

People living in the South West have been least exposed to Covid-19, with just 7,680 cases diagnosed there at a rate of 137 infections per 100,000 people.

HOW AVERAGE DAILY POSITIVE TESTS DROPPED IN MAY 

All regions of England saw the average number of positive tests they recorded each day drop by more than half between the first week of May and the last.

The figures are calculated by averaging the number of positive tests each day between May 1 and May 7, and comparing this to the average number of daily positive tests between May 23 and May 29.

The late May figures may still be subject to change – a five-day buffer has been left to account for as yet unreliable data over the weekend and in the past 48 hours.

REGION  

London

North East

South West

East of Eng

Yorkshire

South East

West Mids

North West

East Mids 

START MAY

136

126

75

183

191

189

169

247

87 

END MAY

25

32

20

51

57

62

54

101

41 

 % CHANGE

82%

75%

73%

72%

70%

67%

68%

59%

52% 

A closer look at PHE’s data shows that Barrow-in-Furness, in Cumbria, has the worst rate of infection of any local authority in the country.

The seaside town near the Lake District has had 561 diagnosed cases of Covid-19 from a population of around 67,000 people. Its infection rate is 836 cases per 100,000 people.

Ashford in Kent has seen infections at a rate of 628 per 100,000 (812 total), while the rate is 553 per 100,000 in Lancaster, where a total 798 cases have been found.

Others in the list of worst-affected places include South Lakeland (Cumbria), Sunderland, Gateshead, South Tyneside, Middlesbrough, Blackpool and Oldham.

All except Ashford are in the hard-hit North East and North West regions of England. 

Meanwhile, more rural and southern areas have got off lightly in the first wave of Britain’s epidemic. 

Torridge, Devon, is the least affected district in England, with a total of 36 cases and an infection rate of just 53 per 100,000 – 16 times lower than in Barrow-in-Furness.

This is followed by Mendip in Somerset, which contains Frome and Glastonbury, where 63 cases of Covid-19 have been confirmed. The infection rate is 55 per 100,000.

Other areas that appear to have gotten off lightly so far include Hastings, West Lindsey (Lincolnshire), Rutland (East Midlands), South Hams (Devon), West and North Devon, Dorset and North East Lincolnshire. 

A decline in positive tests across all regions is noticeable by averaging the total number of daily positive tests results in the first week of May and comparing this to those in the week ending May 29.

The latter figures may be subject to change but are more reliable than more recent figures from the weekend or this week, which may not yet have been completed.

London recorded 82 per cent fewer cases per day, on average, at the end of May when compared to the beginning – a drop from 136 to just 25. 

In the North East, the average number of daily positive tests fell from 126 in the first week of May to 32 per day in the last week of the month – a 75 per cent drop.

The South West saw a fall of 73 per cent from 75 cases per day to 20.

In the East of England the number fell from 183 to 51 (72 per cent), and in Yorkshire and the Humber it dropped 70 per cent from 191 to a 57 daily average.

In South East England the daily average fell from 189 to 62 (67 per cent), in the West Midlands it was 169 to 54 (68 per cent), in the North West 247 to 101 (59 per cent), and in the East Midlands it fell from 87 to 41 (52 per cent). 

The data comes after a separate analysis by The Telegraph showed that the coronavirus pandemic has driven up death rates in some parts of London to double what they are in a usual year.

Official statistics show the number of Britons who died during the first five months of 2020 was massively higher than average because of the Covid-19 crisis. 

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) yesterday revealed at least 56,000 ‘excess deaths’ have been recorded in England and Wales alone, while the figure for the entirety of the UK is in the region of 62,000.

And while not all of these people have been direct victims of the coronavirus, many have died because of indirect impacts of the outbreak, such as reduced NHS services.

The London borough of Brent is the worst affected part of England and Wales by this measure, with the number of deaths soaring from 447 in January-May in an average year to 925 in 2020 – an increase of 108 per cent.

Data shows that 17 out of the 20 worst affected places across the two countries are all boroughs of the capital.

Other parts of London that witnessed their death tolls approximately double were Harrow (99.7 per cent increase), Newham (95.4 per cent) and Enfield (90.3 per cent).

The highest increase in deaths outside of London was seen in Hertsmere in Hertfordshire, where fatalities rose by 86.2 per cent from 236 to 439. 

Meanwhile, more than a dozen areas across the two countries actually appeared to be unaffected by the outbreak and saw the numbers of people dying fall to lower-than average levels.  

In North East Lincolnshire the death rate dropped by 8.8 per cent, while it fell by 8.2 per cent in Conwy, Wales, and by five per cent on Anglesey, off the Welsh coast.

THE 20 AUTHORITIES IN ENGLAND AND WALES WITH THE MOST COVID-19 CASES…

PLACE 

Barrow-in-Furness

Ashford

Lancaster

South Lakeland

Sunderland

Gateshead

South Tyneside

Middlesbrough

Blackpool

Oldham

Thanet

Carlisle

Knowsley

Brent

King’s Lynn and West Norfolk

Dartford

Sheffield

St. Helens

Watford

Oxford

TOTAL CASES 

561 

812

798

527

1,381

1,005

745

678

649

1,084

651

493

670

1,476

670                             

479

2,541

753

404

643

CASES PER 100k 

835.6 

628.1

553.2

504.2

497.8

496.3

495.8

482.4

465.9

460.1

459

454.9

447.9

446.2

441.3                          

436.6

436.2

418.2

417.5

416.6

… AND THE 20 AREAS THAT HAVE RECORDED THE FEWEST COVID-19 CASES

PLACE 

Torridge

Mendip

Hastings

West Lindsey

Rutland

South Hams

West Devon

North Devon

Dorset

North East Lincolnshire

East Devon

Rother

Cornwall and Isles of Scilly

Arun

Wiltshire

South Somerset

Teignbridge

South Kesteven

North Kesteven

East Lindsey 

TOTAL CASES 

36

63

55

80

35

80

53

93

365

156                              

141

95

576                              

164

534

184

148

164

135

164 

CASES PER 100k 

52.8

54.8

59.2

84.3

88.2

92.8

95.4

96.8

96.9

97.6                             

97.7

99.3

101.4                           

102.6

107.2

109.6

111.4

115.6

116.4

116.5 

REVEALED: HOW MANY CASES OF COVID-19 HAVE BEEN DIAGNOSED IN YOUR LOCAL AUTHORITY SINCE THE OUTBREAK BEGAN?LOCAL AUTHORITYCASESRATE PER 100,000LOCAL AUTHORITYCASESRATE PER 100,000Barrow-in-Furness561835.6South Derbyshire243232.6Ashford812628.1South Ribble257232.5Lancaster798553.2Chelmsford411232.1South Lakeland527504.2Hackney649232.1Sunderland1,381497.8Herefordshire, County of444231.1Gateshead1,005496.3Stafford314231.1South Tyneside745495.8Broadland299231Middlesbrough678482.4Derby591229.8Blackpool649465.9Central Bedfordshire650229.2Oldham1,084460.1Hambleton208228.2Thanet651459East Hampshire274227Carlisle493454.9Northampton508225.6Knowsley670447.9Staffordshire Moorlands222225.6Brent1,476446.2Swale334224.9King’s Lynn and West Norfolk670441.3Tandridge196224Dartford479436.6Coventry816222.5Sheffield2,541436.2Southend-on-Sea405222St. Helens753418.2Haringey597220.6Watford404417.5Hinckley and Bosworth247219.7Oxford643416.6Derbyshire Dales158219.5Harrow1,032412.6Burnley194219.1Basingstoke and Deane723411.4York459218.7Copeland281410.7Chesterfield228217.9Rushmoor390409.9Stevenage191217.7Folkestone and Hythe459407.7Wakefield751217.7Bury764401.9Runnymede190215.9Southwark1,272400.9Worcester220215.9Wirral1,295400.6Peterborough431214.4Barnsley974397.2East Northamptonshire200213Croydon1,511392.1Bracknell Forest257211.2Bromley1,280386.6Blaby212211.1Walsall1,091385North Somerset451210.8County Durham2,013382Cannock Chase210209.8Wolverhampton1,001382Broxtowe237209.2Bedford652379.9Aylesbury Vale416208.6Hertsmere390374.3Chiltern200208.5Lambeth1,211371.6South Bucks146208.4Rotherham983371.4Richmond upon Thames410208.2Wigan1,208370.5Telford and Wrekin368207Warrington772368.4City of London18206.8Salford935367.5Warwick294206.3Darlington391366.9Breckland287206Sutton750366.7Swindon455205Rochdale801364.1Pendle187204.6Stockport1,054361.2Wellingborough162203.8Luton771360.1Eastleigh267202.6Bolton1,024358.8Wychavon256201Reading585358.4Tower Hamlets634199.6Hammersmith and Fulham664358.1Welwyn Hatfield244198.8Newcastle upon Tyne1,064354.4Lewes203197.6Hartlepool329352.8Worthing217197.2Ealing1,203351.8Eden104196.7Trafford828350.3Tewkesbury182196.5Newcastle-under-Lyme453349.8Thurrock339196.5Reigate and Banstead514347.9Sevenoaks236196.2Sefton932338.4Broxbourne190196.1Cheshire West and Chester1,151338Bassetlaw229196Merton697338Colchester376195.3Dover393336Bolsover155194.9Nuneaton and Bedworth428332Castle Point175194.3Barnet1,299331.3Rochford169194.3West Lancashire377330.8Windsor and Maidenhead292193.5Liverpool1,630329.4Islington462193.2Tameside740328.6Mid Sussex288192.4Boston227327.2Havant242192.3Fylde261327.2Hart183190Cheshire East1,241325.9Milton Keynes510189.9Lewisham986324.8Ashfield241189.5Wyre360323.7Harrogate304189.4Northumberland1,023319.4Spelthorne188189.3Kensington and Chelsea498318.8Elmbridge258188.8North East Derbyshire322318.4Fenland190187.2Sandwell1,037316.8Crawley210186.8Halton405315.3Gedling220186.8Surrey Heath280315.1Woking188185.8Preston444313.1Nottingham613185.2Gloucester403311.7Hyndburn149184.4Solihull667310.4Tunbridge Wells217183.8Redcar and Cleveland423309.4Cambridge228181.3West Oxfordshire339308.7Rugby194181Stoke-on-Trent784306.4Corby128180.7Wandsworth997305.4Harborough166179.5Slough454304.5East Hertfordshire264178.3Stockton-on-Tees595301.7Malvern Hills137175.4Canterbury496301.4South Norfolk242175.3North Lincolnshire518301.2Cotswold155174.1North Tyneside619300.5North Hertfordshire231173.4Bromsgrove295299Kirklees759173Kingston upon Thames524298.6Mid Suffolk177172.7Chorley346296.2Tonbridge and Malling223170.9Harlow256295.6Somerset West and Taunton261169.6Winchester367295.3Uttlesford151169.3North Warwickshire190293Charnwood307168.1Bexley724292.8Stroud198166.4Manchester1,587289.8Rushcliffe193164Newham1,003284.9Erewash189163.7Stratford-on-Avon363284.5Daventry138163.3Birmingham3,241284Ribble Valley98163.2Kingston upon Hull, City of734281.6Babergh149163Great Yarmouth279280.8Torbay221162.8Scarborough305280.5North Norfolk170162.6Gravesham297279.2Norwich226160.1Waltham Forest769277.9Braintree242159.7Redditch236277.7Sedgemoor195158.8Three Rivers258277.3Amber Valley200157.9Cherwell413276.9South Northamptonshire145156.7Blackburn with Darwen411275.9New Forest280155.8Havering711275.8Fareham181155.6Medway766275.7Adur99155Dudley880274.5North West Leicestershire157153.7Cheltenham321274.1Brighton and Hove444152.9Epping Forest357272.2Selby136152.6Oadby and Wigston155271.7Bristol, City of706152.4Lichfield282271.2Portsmouth320148.7Hounslow731270Horsham211148.4East Staffordshire320269.9Maldon95147.5East Riding of Yorkshire916269.7Eastbourne152147.3Wokingham447266.1Gosport124145.4Enfield887265.7Ryedale79143.8Mole Valley229262.5South Gloucestershire403142.6Basildon487262Isle of Wight200141.3South Oxfordshire365259.8Melton72140.9Epsom and Ewell206257.7Wycombe246140.9Maidstone438257.7Calderdale294139.9Doncaster800257.6Plymouth358136.1Allerdale251257.4Wealden216134.9Westminster657257.3Newark and Sherwood163134.1Hillingdon784257.2South Cambridgeshire210133.3Huntingdonshire455256.6Forest of Dean115132.9Guildford379256.3Exeter169129.6Leicester907255.3East Cambridgeshire113126.5Ipswich349253.8West Suffolk226126.3South Staffordshire284253.3Mansfield134123.1Shropshire810252.9Lincoln121122.2Craven142249.9Bournemouth, Christchurch and Poole483122Redbridge758249.5Bath and North East Somerset234121.8Bradford1,336248.7Mid Devon97118.7St Albans366248.3Chichester142117.6Richmondshire132247.9East Lindsey164116.5East Suffolk612246.5North Kesteven135116.4Rossendale174245.4South Kesteven164115.6Greenwich700244.6Teignbridge148111.4Kettering247243.9South Somerset184109.6Test Valley305243.7Wiltshire534107.2Brentwood185241.7Arun164102.6South Holland227241.5Cornwall and Isles of Scilly576101.4Waverley303241.2Rother9599.3Camden630240.3East Devon14197.7West Berkshire379239.1North East Lincolnshire15697.6Wyre Forest241238.5Dorset36596.9Tendring347238North Devon9396.8Vale of White Horse314234.8West Devon5395.4Tamworth180234.7South Hams8092.8Barking and Dagenham497234.4Rutland3588.2High Peak216234.2West Lindsey8084.3Dacorum360233.3Hastings5559.2Leeds1,840233.1Mendip6354.8Southampton589233Torridge3652.8Source: Department of Health



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